Skip to content

Eric Badros, writer/director: CLEW

February 25, 2015
Director Eric Badros and actor Paul Atkins on the set of CLEW

Director Eric Badros and DOP Paul Atkins on the set of CLEW

1Q: Tell us a little about the origins of CLEW, from concept to financing.

I met Taylor Graham (Jack Hadrian) through a mutual friend and one night, we were talking about our frustrations with the film business – me not having a studio-feature handed to me, him not getting roles that were meaty, we decided to just make our own. I would write something that would showcase his abilities.

I suggested we contact Heather Weeks (Evelyn Campbell) as I had worked with her a bunch and was really impressed with her. She agreed to come on board.

We started meeting once a week, building the structure of a THE BIG CHILL type movie. After our meetings I would go home, write, and bring pages for notes. When we finally had the script, I went to some of my investors and got money for the movie – mostly family and friends. Then we cast everything and at the end of 2008 we were ready to go.

As I started getting closer to the production, I started realizing that I wasn’t super passionate about the script and didn’t think that I was the best person to direct. I felt really bad about it all and called Taylor and Heather together to break the news. Beforehand though, I talked to my investors and asked if it would be cool if we made a different movie, to which they agreed.

So that night when I met with Taylor and Heather, I let them know I’d be open to making another film, and opened the floor for suggestions. We had a few drinks and the premise for CLEW was born.

A lot of the story was informed by a script I had written earlier – RAZING WINTER which was heavily influenced by GODEL, ESCHER, BACH. We met a few more times and built out the story structure. We were shooting within a few months.

2Q: Cinequest Film Festival is hosting the World Premiere of CLEW. Explain to us how it feels to bring this film before audiences for the first time, and what do you think their reaction will be to your film?

My feelings are a bit ambivalent. Making CLEW has been such a wonderful, lovely thing, that I don’t want it to be over. So while I’m excited to share the film, it definitely signifies the end of a period of my life.

I don’t really know what to expect in terms of a reaction. This movie has not been screen-tested except with close friends and family. Based on those screenings, I would guess people are going to be talking to each other about it after the movie and want to see it again. I can definitely say that one of my favorite things about filmmaking is watching it with an audience.

3Q: What was your best and/or worst experience while making CLEW?

Best experience was working with Taylor and Heather, rehearsing and just having fun. They are awesome and so infinitely watchable.

Worst experience was probably the non-creative aspects of finishing. I did most of the VFX myself and the rotoscoping that I didn’t farm out got to be miserable after a while.

4Q: Festival audiences often have to make hard decisions about what to see, and the catalog descriptions sometimes run together. In your own words, why should people see your film?

Not only is it a suspenseful thriller, Clew is a timely and thought-provoking film that will stay with you after it ends. If you like cerebral sci-fi like PRIMER or eXistenZ, 80s thrillers like JAGGED EDGE or MISERY (actually 1990), or noir like LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN, this is the film for you.

5Q: Time to pre-plan: You just won the Oscar for CLEW. Give us your acceptance speech.

I have quite an imagination, but I like to keep things in the realm of possibility. Let me just say, at this point in my career, I don’t think winning an Oscar would be a blessing.

See CLEW at Cinequest!
View the trailer!
Follow them on Facebook!

Clew_1_1000x316

From → Interviews

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Love in the Time of Monsters

Love in the Time of Monsters

Artsalot

Your Arts & Culture Kingdom

theurv

I'm Just Me

PHIL'S FILM ADVENTURES

Reviews & Interviews from Bay Area Film Festivals

Cinebanter

Reviews & Interviews from Bay Area Film Festivals

Jason Watches Movies

Reviews & Interviews from Bay Area Film Festivals

Cinequesting

Reviews & Interviews from Bay Area Film Festivals

%d bloggers like this: